Updatery: After The Submission Deadline

Assalamu Alaikum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatuh

Thank you so much for your support and especially your submission to the Intersections: Woman, Artist, Muslim anthology project. The next phase in our plan is to, of course, read your submissions. We hope to get through them within the next two months at the very latest and plan to respond to each submitter to let you know whether or not we will be able to use your piece. So expect to hear from us by June 1st, 2012- insha Allah!

Thank you again and peace be with you,
~Aaminah and Brooke
Co-editors “Intersections: Woman, Artist, Muslim” an anthology

Submission Deadline Extended to March 31, 2012

Intersections: Woman, Artist, Muslim

Ruminations on Being, Creating and Believing

Bismillah al Rahman al Raheem

This is a call for submissions for a new project, the anthology Artist Intersections: Woman, Artist, Muslim. As you well know art and all its various forms, such as poetry, performance, film, illustration, fashion, are often misunderstood and even demonized in the greater Muslim community. The intent of this project is to reflect on the experiences of creative/creating Muslimahs to (insha Allah) dispel some of these myths as well as to inspire others to maximize their God-given talents and the blessings available through doing so.

As this project hopes to reveal (notice we didn’t say “unveil”!) a wide scope of the artists and artistic happenings, both visual and literary, across the ummah, we are open to accepting a diverse array of writing styles, including and by no means limited to essays, dialogues, creative non-fiction writing and poetry that is directly relevant to the subject matter. We would also like to include some inspiring, entertaining and/or insightful interviews of artsy sisters. You are welcome to put together an interview for submittal, contact us for suggestions of sisters of interest, or run by us ideas of potential interviewees.

Works which include excerpts from Quran, hadith, and other Muslim Maxims are of course welcomed in this project, however if your style or preference does not include such, your work is also welcome as we strive for inclusion of a diverse representation of believers, respecting the individuality in each Muslim point of view. This is not an anthology of “Islamic Art,” rather it is an anthology of Muslim Women Artists. In the spirit of inclusivity we ask that writers consider their readers and therefore cannot accept any work which includes vulgarity or explicit depictions of sex. Submissions from Sisters of Color are especially appreciated.

We would love to hear about issues related to being a Muslim woman artist, such as:

  • Internal and external struggles with accepting yourself as a artist
  • Rectifying your culture, art and religion
  • Epiphany-like moments related to being an artist
  • Art and dawah
  • Art as ibadah
  • Art as rizk: Being a working (as in selling) artist
  • Accepting yourself as being a creative being or non-working (as in selling) artist
  • Creativity and your community
  • Reflections on historical Muslim arts and artists which inspire you
  • Anything else related to your being an artist, a woman and a Muslim

Submission Guideline Details:

  • Email all submissions both as .doc and pasted in the content of your email to intersectionsanthology@gmail.com
  • Maximum 5,000 words
  • Include a 2-3 sentence biography
  • If you have one, include website or blog url
  • Submissions due March 1st, 2012 PLEASE NOTE THE SUBMISSION DEADLINE HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO MARCH 31, 2012

Information about compensation, copy rights and similar will not be available until a publisher has been secured, minimally each accepted entry will receive a copy of the anthology.

Please help spread the word! Share the submission guidelines for Intersections:  Woman, Artist, Muslim on your blog, website, social networks and with all of your creative sisters.

Editors:

 
Brooke Benoit is an almost graduate of the San Francisco Art Institute and has a B.A. in Rhetoric from the University of Alaska at Anchorage. She lives in Casablanca, Morocco where her current preferred mediums are gemstones and words.
 
Aaminah Shakur is a self-taught experimental poet and artist whose work is most informed by her First Nations/Indigenous and traditional Sufi Muslim cultures. She has produced four zines and is currently tangled up in yarn.
 
To keep up with the project, please see us:
Tumblr (a resource of creative work and inspiration)

Thank you!

Just realized that there were several comments caught in the spam guard and want to thank you all for your support and encouragement. We’re just a few weeks into promoting the project and already it has been a great experience to find and learn about so many different on goings among the artsy leg of the ummah. We’re getting very excited about this project–please keep the suggestions and support coming!

triple threat by Sumayyah Talibah


triple threat

are you talking to me?
with that excuse me please
pointing to the back of the line
where I’m expected to wait
for Hell to freeze over
and over I ask you
what did I do
to be so black and blue
that my color stands for weakness
evil and negativity
ignorance and mis-education
I look at you and feel
an odd vibration
humming in my teeth
hearing you state that my future is bleak
because
I’m always second-guessed
‘cuz my sex stands for oppressed
even though I valiantly
seek to downplay my femininity
giving you reason to castigate me
treat me like broken and worthless property

I see you look at me and freeze
an icy gleam in your eye
mumbling incoherently
like common sense has fled
as you stutter and wonder
what’s that thing on my head?
checking me for weapons
as if a rocket launcher could fit in my purse
you spit out Allahu Akbar
like it’s a curse
mocking my religion
questioning my decision
separating my family
causing unnecessary division
go back to where I came from?
I’m only 20 miles from home

over and over
I ask you
what did I do
to be so black and red
and white and blue

From Sumayyah Said So.com

Different Ways to Pray BY NAOMI SHIHAB NYE

There was the method of kneeling,
a fine method, if you lived in a country
where stones were smooth.
The women dreamed wistfully of bleached courtyards,
hidden corners where knee fit rock.
Their prayers were weathered rib bones,
small calcium words uttered in sequence,
as if this shedding of syllables could somehow
fuse them to the sky.

 

There were the men who had been shepherds so long
they walked like sheep.
Under the olive trees, they raised their arms—
Hear us! We have pain on earth!
We have so much pain there is no place to store it!
But the olives bobbed peacefully
in fragrant buckets of vinegar and thyme.
At night the men ate heartily, flat bread and white cheese,
and were happy in spite of the pain,
because there was also happiness.

 

Some prized the pilgrimage,
wrapping themselves in new white linen
to ride buses across miles of vacant sand.
When they arrived at Mecca
they would circle the holy places,
on foot, many times,
they would bend to kiss the earth
and return, their lean faces housing mystery.

 

While for certain cousins and grandmothers
the pilgrimage occurred daily,
lugging water from the spring
or balancing the baskets of grapes.
These were the ones present at births,
humming quietly to perspiring mothers.
The ones stitching intricate needlework into children’s dresses,
forgetting how easily children soil clothes.

 

There were those who didn’t care about praying.
The young ones. The ones who had been to America.
They told the old ones, you are wasting your time.
      Time?—The old ones prayed for the young ones.
They prayed for Allah to mend their brains,
for the twig, the round moon,
to speak suddenly in a commanding tone.

 

And occasionally there would be one
who did none of this,
the old man Fowzi, for example, Fowzi the fool,
who beat everyone at dominoes,
insisted he spoke with God as he spoke with goats,
and was famous for his laugh.
From here.

Submission Guidelines for Intersections: Woman, Artist, Muslim. An Anthology

Intersections: Woman, Artist, Muslim                                                          Ruminations on Being, Creating, and Believing

Bismillah al Rahman al Raheem

This is a call for submissions for a new project, the anthology Artist Intersections: Woman, Artist, Muslim. As you well know art and all its various forms, such as poetry, performance, film, illustration, fashion, are often misunderstood and even demonized in the greater Muslim community. The intent of this project is to reflect on the experiences of creative/creating Muslimahs to (insha Allah) dispel some of these myths as well as to inspire others to maximize their God-given talents and the blessings available through doing so.

As this project hopes to reveal (notice we didn’t say “unveil”!) a wide scope of the artists and artistic happens, both visual and literary, across the ummah, we are open to accepting a diverse array of writing styles, including and by no means limited to essays, dialogues, creative non-fiction writing and poetry that is directly relevant to the subject matter. We would also like to include some inspiring, entertaining and/or insightful interviews of artsy sisters. You are welcome to put together an interview for submittal, contact us for suggestions of sisters of interest, or run by us ideas of potential interviewees.

Works which include excerpts from Quran, hadith, and other Muslim Maxims are of course welcomed in this project, however if your style or preference does not include such, your work is also welcome as we strive for inclusion of a diverse representation of believers, respecting the individuality in each Muslim point of view. This is not an anthology of “Islamic Art,” rather it is an anthology of Muslim Women Artists. In the spirit of inclusivity we ask that writers consider their readers and therefore cannot accept any work which includes vulgarity or explicit depictions of sex. Submissions from Sisters of Color are especially appreciated.

We would love to hear about issues related to being a Muslim woman artist, such as:

  • Internal and external struggles with accepting yourself as a artist
  • Rectifying your culture, art and religion
  • Epiphany-like moments related to being an artist
  • Art and dawah
  • Art as ibadah
  • Art as rizk: Being a working (as in selling) artist
  • Accepting yourself as being a creative being or non-working (as in selling) artist
  • Creativity and your community
  • Reflections on historical Muslim arts and artists which inspire you
  • Anything else related to your being an artist, a woman and a Muslim

Submission Guideline Details:

  • Email all submissions both as .doc and pasted in the content of your email to intersectionsanthology@gmail.com
  • Maximum 5,000 words
  • Include a 2-3 sentence biography
  • If you have one, include website or blog url
  • Submissions due March 1st, 2012

Information about compensation, copy rights and similar will not be available until a publisher has been secured, minimally each accepted entry will receive a copy of the anthology.

Please help spread the word! Share the submission guidelines for Intersections:  Woman, Artist, Muslim on your blog, website, social networks and with all of your creative sisters.

Link Love: Art is Worship by Sabina Giado

Political activism is Ibadah. My work, as I’ve expressed before, for me is often a form of activism.

Allah (SWT) has put in my heart the love of writing. Does this mean that writing could be a form of Ibadah? Subhanallah!

When one grows up thinking that only if you read the Qur’an and pray day and night will you reach the highest levels of Jannah, such a concept blows the mind.

Art is Ibadah.

If this is Allah (SWT)’s Rizq (provision for me), if this makes my heart beat, my blood quicken, my eyes refuse to shut even if it’s way past my bedtime, and most beloved of all, fills my heart with gratitude to Allah (SWT) with every letter I type, I believe that it may well be mustahhab (highly recommended), maybe even Fard (compulsory) for me to hone my craft.

Anything less would be ungrateful.

If the world tells me to shut up and go be an accountant (my apologies to all the passionate accountants reading this), I would remind myself that the secular world is also currently opposed to a myriad of outwardly religious activities, for example, the hijab.  Spiritual art by comparison is a cakewalk and much easier to explain.

If I am not grateful for my provisions, including my love of writing, AND if I don’t serve my community through it, ultimately that barakah (blessing) will be taken from me. It is part of my religious duty to nurture it.

Allah (SWT) has placed love in my heart for writing. Mashallah, there must be a reason for that. Won’t stop till I find out what that reason is.

Read the rest here.